THE BUNNY GIRL
INTRODUCTION

THE PLAYBOY 'LIFESTYLE'

PLAYBOY IN BRITAIN

BUNNY TRAINING

FINANCIAL MISCONDUCT

RESOURCES

GALLERY OF LONDON BUNNIES

THE HISTORY OF THE PLAYBOY BUNNY

SITE MAP

THE PLAYBOY 'LIFESTYLE'

Planet Hefner was created in the early 1950s, when 'Hef' founded the Playboy empire. What Hefner sold were aspirations, a vision of the world according to his Playboy magazine. It was peopled by smart and rising young executives, speeding from boardroom to boardroom in crisp shirts and European sports cars, and then at night swapping their snappy three-piece Italian suits for tuxedos and what 'Hef' identified as an 'adult' lifestyle - the gaming tables at a Playboy club and Martinis proffered by Bunny Girls. In Hefner's dream of 'sophistication', this world was full of gadgets, golf clubs and executive toys - and one of those toys was a beautiful woman.

In truth, the Playboy lifestyle was not so much adult as the fantasy of an eternal adolescent. It made Hefner rich, and his wealth bought him the fantasy. But Hefner's was a lifestyle which few would chose and even fewer would enjoy for any length of time. He once described an average day in his life: 'Get up in the early morning, have a meeting, there's a regular buffet, a couple of movies, go upstairs round about 1am with girlfriend or whoever, make love, then have a meal, watch a movie or two.'

In an interview with Hugh Hefner in the Sunday Times (22 September 1985), the British writer Martin Amis observed that the Hefner lifestyle - turning night into day, and spent almost entirely in slippers and dressing gown - seemed like a case study in terminal depression. It was a control freak's life, banishing the possibility of the unexpected or the outside world thrusting itself messily into the ordered Playboy universe. Hefner was famous for never venturing outside his Playboy fortress in Chicago. He later moved to Los Angeles, itself a kind of huge controlled environment in which the sun shines all day long and young women are browner and bustier than those in the Windy City.

Determined not to be thought a mere smut peddler, Hefner filled the space on either side of the centrefolds in Playboy magazine with highly paid pieces fashioned by America's literary lions. So the Playmate of the Month rubbed shoulders with the likes of Norman Mailer. Hefner saw Playboy as a literary magazine with tits, but how many of Hefner's readers lingered over Norman Mailer before thumbing their way quickly to the centrefold?

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PLAYBOY IN BRITAIN

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